Succulents that need little or no water other than rainfall, grow in nutrient-poor soil, and handle searing sun and frost are native to the Southwest and Mexico: dasylirions, agaves, cacti and yuccas (DACYs). These no-nonsense plants thrive from Mexico to the Bay Area, and in parts of Colorado, Texas and the Carolinas (Zones 7b and higher). The Laguna Beach garden shown here has all four.

No water succulent garden
Above: Mark and Cindy Evans’ hilltop garden in Laguna Beach, CA has all sorts of DACYs. Also in their garden are euphorbias, crassulas (jades) and aloes.  Can you tell which is which?

Above: In the Evans garden are Yucca rostrata, Agave attenuata and Yucca aloifolia (Spanish Bayonet). A topdressing of golden decomposed granite lends a finished look.

Above: Two Dasylirion whipplei (which resemble pincushions) are 15 years old. The Yucca aloifolia at left was there when Mark and Cindy bought the house in 1999. “I think it’s pretty old; its base is huge,” Mark says. Four silvery blue Yucca rostrata also are 15 (the much larger one at right gets more sun). Mark planted the spineless paddle cactus along the wall from cuttings six years ago. Behind them, at right, is a 6-year-old blue Agave americana. Growing in the dry fountain are 8-year-old foxtail agaves (Agave attenuata).

How is it possible that yuccas and dasylirions, which have thin leaves, are succulents?  It’s because the store water in their trunks. A succulent is “any plant that stores water in fleshy leaves or stems in order to withstand periods of drought.” (Some succulents also store water in their roots, but we’ll delve into that another time.)

 

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