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How to Grow Succulents Indoors

If you need (or prefer) to grow succulents indoors, outfit a basement, sun room, spare room or alcove with tables and shelves that can withstand moisture, plus lights and a fan that run on timers. Fortunately succulents need very little water. Dribble a little at the base of each plant every three weeks or so, enough to hydrate the roots but not so much it puddles on the floor.

Place your succulents near a window. Maximum sun exposure is on the south and west sides of your house. The farther north you live in North America, east will provide bright light, but not enough for crassulas, echeverias and aloes to maintain their red hues. [Read more] 

OR…

Install grow lights. Experts in growing succulents in gray-sky climates recommend T-5 grow lights.

Agrobrite FLT44 T5 Fluorescent Grow Light System, 4 Feet, 4 Tubes, about $120 on Amazon.

 

Create a “light island.” Shown below is arguably the ultimate indoor plant-shelf unit. Made of lightweight, powder-coated aluminum, it has adjustable lights with energy-efficient, full-spectrum bulbs; plastic drip trays; and wheels for easy positioning. Three shelves provide 18 square feet of growing space. From Gardener’s Supply Co.; about $600. 

Get a timer which automatically turns the lights on at, say, 7 a.m. and off eight hours later. I like this one, below, because it has multiple outlets:  Titan Apollo 14, about $26. 

Watch the temperature. If it falls below freezing (32 degrees F) many succulents may show long-term damage (or die). This indoor thermometer is digital and also has a humidity gauge. But what I love about it is that it keeps daily high and low temps for 24 hours!

AcuRite 00613 Humidity Monitor with Indoor Thermometer, Digital Hygrometer and Humidity Gauge Indicator, about $10 on Amazon.

Wonder why your otherwise healthy succulent is stretched and doesn’t flower? Go to: Why Doesn’t My Succulent Bloom?

 

 

 

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Watch How You Water!

OK, we all know that succulents are low-water plants. But they’re not “no-water” plants. Although they may survive without irrigation during the heat of summer, they’re unlikely to be lush and healthy.

I suggest that you ~

— Check your automatic irrigation system. Trust me, it needs it, and maintaining it can mean life or death to prized plants. Watch for leafy growth blocking sprayers, clogged riser heads, and plugged drip lines.

— Pay keen attention to soil moisture during heat waves and desiccating winds.

— If the root zone goes dry, supplement auto irrigation with hose watering. (See my canary-in-the-mineshaft way to evaluate evaporation in my latest video, Succulents, Sun and Summer.)

— Water early in the morning or late in the day. Note to desert gardeners: Watering in midday heat can literally cook roots. (Eek!)

— HOWEVER, aeoniums, dudleyas and other succulents that have closed their rosettes should be watered minimally or not at all, lest dormant roots rot. The plants will revive when the rains return. (They may not make it until then, though, if in full sun. So, shade them.)

— If the ground is concrete-hard, leave a hose dripping overnight to create an underground cone of moist soil.

— Trees and shrubs want water where their canopies would naturally direct rainfall: around the perimeter of the plant.

— Add gravel topdressing around succulents (or use organic mulch for woody plants) to help hold moisture in the soil.

— Take the opportunity, when hose-watering, to blast pests, fallen leaves and dirt out of leaf axils and the centers of rosettes.

— Use a hose-end sprayer—ideally one with multiple settings—to direct water where you want it.

— A hose lying in summer sun may contain scalding water. You already know this, but your house-sitter may not, so be sure to mention it.

— If you have a hose-full of hot water, aim a fine spray skyward. Droplets will cool by the time they hit leaves.

What about potted succulents?

From my website’s FAQ’s:  Aim to keep soil about as moist as a wrung-out sponge. About once a week should do it. Water thoroughly to soak the roots and flush salts. Let common sense prevail: Water more during hot, dry spells and less or not at all during periods of high humidity, cool temperatures and rain.

ALSO SEE: Page 56 of Succulents Simplified, pp. 219-222 of Succulent Container Gardens, and pp. 134-135 of Designing with Succulents (second edition). 

How to Fertilize Your Succulents

Time to Feed Your Succulents

Fertilize succulents when they’re emerging from dormancy and beginning their annual growth spurt, which for most is spring. A light feeding of manure tea, diluted fish emulsion, or a balanced fertilizer will help them grow lush and lovely. See my video. 

Link to video of Debra video about fertilizing succulents

What do I use?

For container-grown succulents, one Moo Poo tea bag per three gallons of water, steeped overnight.

Uh…”Moo Poo?”

Yes. Otherwise known as Authentic Haven Brand Soil Conditioner, Premium Manure Tea. (Btw, I’m not getting paid to endorse it.)

What about in-ground succulents?

I apply Ironite before a winter rainstorm (I know, it’s too late) and a balanced granular fertilizer in March.

How to apply?

Water the plants, then pour manure tea until it begins to run out the pot. In the garden, spread granular fertilizer and water it in.

What kind of granular fertilizer?

The brand doesn’t matter, but the ratio of N (nitrogen), P (phosphorous) and K (potassium) should be equal.

How much?

Succulents need about half the dose recommended on the package.

Is there an organic alternative?

Apply a topdressing of compost. I like fish emulsion, too, for both pots and in-ground plants (diluted half strength).

How often?

Once in spring when daytime temps stay above 60 degrees F. Then again in June.

What if I don’t feed my succulents?

No biggie, but they’ll look and perform better if you do.

Is it OK to fertilize more frequently?

That’s what many growers do. A little bit of fertilizer with every watering promotes rapid growth. However, such plants are considered “soft” (a nursery term) rather than “hard,” meaning tough. It’s a trade-off. I grow my succulents hard to help them endure the vicissitudes of the open garden.

Anything else?

Soils vary from region to region and even within a garden. The best way to know what your soil lacks is to have it tested, but it’s common sense that succulents growing in, say, oak leaf mulch are getting ample nutrients and don’t need fertilizing; those living in pots for years or growing in decomposed granite probably do.

No other soil amendment is as widely used by succulent growers and collectors as pumice (crushed lava rock). Here’s why. [Read more]