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Spring in My Succulent Garden

In spring, my garden is less about succulents and more about flowers…well, actually, that’s not true. The garden’s most vivid blooms are those of ice plants. Singing alongside them in spring are poppies, daisies, wisteria, bulbs, and yes, some succulents—notably Aloe maculata and Bulbine frutescens.

Below are a few stills and the plant list from my new YouTube video: Debra Lee Baldwin’s Succulent Garden in Spring. Enjoy!

An ordinarily unexciting corner of my garden is stunning in spring solely because of all the blooms. Red ones at center are Sparaxis tricolor, a bulb from South Africa.

California poppies literally pop in spring. I encourage these bright orange annuals to reseed every year. Behind them is Drosanthemum floribundum (rosea ice plant).

Scilla peruviana returns every March. I’m always a little surprised to see it. It was planted by my home’s previous owners, and I don’t do anything to care for it. It produces these large, purple-blue snowflakes and then disappears from summer through winter.

I planted bright red geraniums near this orange-red iceplant. I can’t recall if I did it on purpose, but they do bloom at the same time. I’ll bet you can see them from outer space.

Those and more are in the video. Here’s the plant list:

Flowering Plants in Debra’s Garden

Inland Southern CA, Zone 9b

Spring (peak): mid-March to early April

Annual: California poppies

Bulbs:

Babiana stricta (baboon flower)

Scilla peruviana

         Sparaxis tricolor

Succulents:

Aeonium arboreum

         Aloe maculata

         Bulbine frutescens ‘Hallmark’

Gasteria sp.

Ice Plants:

Delosperma congestum ‘Gold Nugget’

Drosanthemum floribundum

                  Drosanthemum speciosum

         Sedum ‘Firestorm’

Perennial shrubs:

Euryops pectinatus

Gazanias (African daisies)

Pelargoniums (geraniums)

Rose, climbing: ‘Altissimo’

Wisteria

 

I just realized none of these are pastel. Can you imagine? They’d look pale and sickly alongside all that brain-bashing color. I do have some lovely, peach-toned irises that come up late spring. Every year I intend to dig and move them to a better spot, aesthetically speaking, and every year I forget. I vow I’ll go ’round and tie ribbons to the plants when they come into bloom. Uh…remind me?

How to Fertilize Your Succulents

Time to Feed Your Succulents

Fertilize succulents when they’re emerging from dormancy and beginning their annual growth spurt, which for most is spring. A light feeding of manure tea, diluted fish emulsion, or a balanced fertilizer will help them grow lush and lovely. See my video. 

Link to video of Debra video about fertilizing succulents

What do I use?

For container-grown succulents, one Moo Poo tea bag per three gallons of water, steeped overnight.

Uh…”Moo Poo?”

Yes. Otherwise known as Authentic Haven Brand Soil Conditioner, Premium Manure Tea. (Btw, I’m not getting paid to endorse it.)

What about in-ground succulents?

I apply Ironite before a winter rainstorm (I know, it’s too late) and a balanced granular fertilizer in March.

How to apply?

Water the plants, then pour manure tea until it begins to run out the pot. In the garden, spread granular fertilizer and water it in.

What kind of granular fertilizer?

The brand doesn’t matter, but the ratio of N (nitrogen), P (phosphorous) and K (potassium) should be equal.

How much?

Succulents need about half the dose recommended on the package.

Is there an organic alternative?

Apply a topdressing of compost. I like fish emulsion, too, for both pots and in-ground plants (diluted half strength).

How often?

Once in spring when daytime temps stay above 60 degrees F. Then again in June.

What if I don’t feed my succulents?

No biggie, but they’ll look and perform better if you do.

Is it OK to fertilize more frequently?

That’s what many growers do. A little bit of fertilizer with every watering promotes rapid growth. However, such plants are considered “soft” (a nursery term) rather than “hard,” meaning tough. It’s a trade-off. I grow my succulents hard to help them endure the vicissitudes of the open garden.

Anything else?

Soils vary from region to region and even within a garden. The best way to know what your soil lacks is to have it tested, but it’s common sense that succulents growing in, say, oak leaf mulch are getting ample nutrients and don’t need fertilizing; those living in pots for years or growing in decomposed granite probably do.