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Spring in the Succulent Garden: Flowers Wow with Bold, Hot Hues

A spring garden’s most vivid blooms often are those of succulent ice plants. Aloes, bulbine and numerous arid-climate companions are bright and beautiful from March through mid-May. Increasing temps tend to put the kibosh on delicate spring flowers. If you live near the coast of CA, you’ll enjoy a longer spring, but you may not get the sun and heat that makes many flowers blaze.

Spring is the season of flowers, so get outside and enjoy them. Soon enough, in summer, those hot colors will fade and your garden will go back to being mainly shapes and textures—which of course succulents do best. What many people  don’t realize is that flowers are ephemeral—they flash and fade, and then you’re left with foliage. (I like to say that sentence in my talks. Try it. The alliteration is luscious.)

Above: A normally uninteresting corner of my garden is stunning in spring because of all the flowers. Red ones at center are Sparaxis tricolor, a bulb from South Africa. Easy-grow shrub daisies (Euryops pectinatus) echo the yellow margins of Agave americana ‘Marginata’—which though nearly engulfed, still makes a bold statement.

California poppies pop in spring. These bright orange annuals reseed every year. Behind them is Drosanthemum floribundum (rosea ice plant). Adding contrasting form is spineless opuntia. Almost incidentally, fruit on citrus trees repeat the poppies, and elevate their color to eye level.

Scilla peruviana, returns every March. It produces large, purple-blue snowflake flowers and then disappears for nine months. It was planted by the previous owner and I don’t do a thing to keep it going. But like all bulbs, it leaves behind droopy, messy foliage which you need to leave because it feeds the bulb for the next g0-round.

And as for ice plant, don’t plant just one variety. Combine several—not curbside, though, lest they cause an accident.

Related articles:

Succulent garden design essentials

How to grow succulents

Debra’s own garden 

My succulent meditation garden

YouTube video: Debra Lee Baldwin’s Succulent Garden in Spring.

Flowering Plants in My Spring Garden: Inland Southern CA, Zone 9b

Spring (peak): mid-March to early April

Annual: California poppies

Bulbs:

Babiana stricta (baboon flower)

Scilla peruviana

         Sparaxis tricolor

Succulents:

Aeonium arboreum

         Aloe maculata

         Bulbine frutescens ‘Hallmark’

Gasteria sp.

Ice Plants:

Delosperma congestum ‘Gold Nugget’

Drosanthemum floribundum

                  Drosanthemum speciosum

         Sedum ‘Firestorm’

Perennial shrubs:

Euryops pectinatus

Gazanias (African daisies)

Pelargoniums (geraniums)

Rose, climbing: ‘Altissimo’

Wisteria

 

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What You Didn’t Know About Debra Lee Baldwin

My hobby is making bird feeders out of repurposed objects. I’m highly visual and love to watch wild birds interacting with airy feeders, so I often use candle holders that have multiple votives that I can fill with birdseed.
I sometimes use wire bird cages for feeders. I think it’s fascinating (and ironic) to see wild birds try to squeeze their way into a cage. This one, which is both ornamental bird cage AND candle holder, hangs outside my office window. See more photos (and even videos!) on my Instagram page. 
Most of my birdfeeders are elegant and pretty, which is my preference. But a silly one—made from a brand-new bra (not mine, it’s way too big)—went viral on Facebook a year ago and has since had 26,000,000 views. Yep. Twenty-six. MILLION.
It’s a perfect example of how combining disparate items—in this case birds and bras—creates a third concept that transcends the two. And because it’s amusing, never-seen-before and a bit naughty, people have shared it to a fare-thee-well. Darn. If only I had made even a penny per view!
So here’s something else about me: I come up with clever ideas that don’t make me rich. But that’s another story, and one that’s not as cynical as it sounds. As game and reality show losers invariably say, “Hey, at least I had fun!”
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Designing with Cold-Climate Succulents

Becky Sell of Sedum Chicks plants cold-hardy succulents in repurposed wood-and-metal containers, hypertufa pots, wreaths and more. She grows the plants, too, where she lives in Turner, Oregon, near the Washington border.

Becky’s compositions can overwinter outdoors in northerly climates (Zones 4 to 8), providing the potting medium drains well. Cold-hardy succulents such as stonecrops and hens-and-chicks will also grow in Zones 8 and 9 if protected from heat in excess of 85 degrees and scorching sun. Some varieties, notably shrub sedums, die to the ground in any locale and come back the following spring.

In her designs, Becky often combines sedums (stonecrops), sempervivums (hens-and-chicks), and Delosperma ice plants. Of a little-known Rosularia species with soft, light green leaves, she says, “When people ask which plant is my favorite, this is definitely on the list.”

There are about 35 species in the genus Rosularia. The sempervivum-like succulents come from Europe, the Himalayas, and northern Africa.

Find more photos of succulents for Northern climates—including many of Becky’s favorites—on my website’s new Cold-Hardy Succulents page. I photographed the designs shown here during the Northwest Flower & Garden Show at the Sedum Chicks booth, which won an award for outstanding visual appeal.

Below: This bright red vertical container was a hit. At right, I darkened the photo to make plant IDs, in white letters, stand out.

Below: Sempervivum ‘Jade Rose’ repeats the teal blue of a Sedum spathulifolium cultivar.

Below: In a cold-hardy wreath, Becky surrounded a large sempervivum rosette with smaller sedums, Delosperma cooperi (at lower left), and Sedum confusum (lower right).

Below: I’ve ID’d the three sedums in this wreath at right. Becky gives her plants “hair cuts” to keep them compact.

“I like its dark edges,” Becky says of Sempervivum ‘Black’, shown below in dramatic contrast with chartreuse Sedum ‘Lemon Coral’. At lower right is a succulent native to Oregon: Sedum oreganum.

Becky and husband Paul create planters from repurposed wood and metal. The bronzy succulents below are Sedum confusum, which blushes red-orange in a sunny location. When less confused, it’s bright apple green.

For wreaths and vertical gardens, Becky uses sphagnum moss to help hold plants in place. She emphasizes the importance of good drainage, which is true for all succulents, but especially those in rainy climates. Succulents from cold climates tend to have thin or small leaves and want a richer potting soil than thicker-leaved varieties from desert regions. Becky recommends Black Gold’s organic mix.

In my YouTube video, “Sedum Chicks at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show,” Becky explains how to select, cultivate and beautifully combine cold-hardy succulents.

 

Learn more about succulents for northerly climates:

On my website:

— Find tips on care and cultivation, plus resources at How to Grow Succulents in Northerly Climates

— See labeled varieties of excellent, readily available varieties on my Cold-Hardy Succulents page. 

On my YouTube channel:

Growing Succulents in Northerly Climates: Part One of my presentation at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show. See gorgeous new Sempervivum cultivars and inspiring, eye-catching design ideas.

Growing Succulents in Northerly Climates, Part Two of my presentation at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show. More cool succulents for cold climates and how to select, grow and design with them.

Sedum Chicks at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show. Pacific NW designer/grower Becky Sell explains how to select, care for and beautifully combine cold-hardy sedums, semps and other succulents.

Make a Frost-Hardy Succulent Wreath with Hens-and-Chicks. Simple steps to a stunning wreath!

In my books:

— See the Cold-Climate Succulent Gardens section of Designing with Succulents (2nd ed.).

— Find info in all my books about succulents in the genera Sedum, Sempervivum, Delosperma and more.

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Tips from a Top Container Garden Designer

Melissa Teisl of Fresh Chic is the designer whose artistry I show most in my book, Succulent Container Gardens. 

Melissa and her mom, Susan, had a floral shop in Solana Beach, CA when I met them in ’07. Then Susan retired, and Melissa (with partner Jon Hawley) launched CW Design & Landscaping, specializing in gorgeous in-ground gardens.

But container gardens are Melissa’s first love (OK, except for Jon), so this dynamic couple—who also are in Succulents Simplified and Designing with Succulents—spun off Fresh Chic, CW’s boutique and container-garden division.

Melissa Teisl designs in Succulent Container Gardens

These photos from Succulent Container Gardens showcase Melissa’s aesthetic. She…

— Picks succulents in scale with their containers.
— Repeats plants’ colors and/or forms in her container selections.
— Uses lines and shapes of pots to lead the eye and frame the plants.
— Plants densely for a lavish look and uses topdressing to conceal the soil.
— Sets a container atop a table that becomes part of the composition.
— Expands her palette with non-succulents. A pink-striped cordyline adds drama to a tall pot; crypthanthus bromeliads create a wreath’s “bow.”
— Jazzes up gift arrangements with real bows of satin or velvet.

Learn more (from Melissa herself!) in my how-to video about hanging containers.

See Fresh Chic’s succulent designs at San Diego’s Spring Home/Garden Show, March 2-4, in the outdoor vendor area. Btw, social media really “likes” Melissa’s innovative, photogenic combos, so have your cell phone handy!

If you happen to be in Southern California, here’s a Free Pass to the Spring Home/Garden Show

Spring Home Show tickets

Come see me at the Show! I’m giving two new presentations and signing all three of my books, including the new 2nd edition of Designing with Succulents.

Fri., March 2 at noon and Sat., March 3 at 11:00, join me in the Bing Crosby exhibit hall in the presenters’ area (southwest corner). Also enjoy display gardens by top designers. The Show’s all about helping you make your home and outdoor living spaces your own private paradise.

Don’t pay admission! Come as my guest/s. You’ll still have to pay parking, but my VIP pass for two lets you waltz right in. (Print it out and bring it with you, like you would an airline boarding pass.) Hey! It’s worth $18! 

Books by Debra Lee Baldwin
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Why Doesn’t My Succulent Bloom?

Succulents (most plants for that matter) need light in order to flower. Sun is essential to photosynthesis, which creates energy and fuels new growth. All plants (actually, all living things) really want to reproduce, and for plants that means being robust enough to bloom. Because most succulents come from warm, dry climates, they require a lot of light.

 If this aloe could talk, it would say, “I’m starved for light! I may not be able to bloom! Help!”

*Aloe maculata (A. saponaria)

Above: A specimen of Aloe maculata growing indoors in the Seattle area. Although it’s healthy, it has flattened and elongated its leaves in order to expose as much of its surface as possible to light. The term for this is etiolation (et-ee-oh-lay-shun).

Aloe maculata (A. saponaria) in bloom

Above: This is how Aloe maculata looks with half a day of sun and half a day of bright shade. Even in these near-ideal conditions, the rosette and flower spikes lean in the direction of greatest light. Leaf tips have protected themselves from too much sun with reddish-brown pigmentation. (It’s similar to melanin, which causes skin to tan or freckle.)
Above: In all-day sun with minimal water, a similar specimen’s leaves have shortened to reduce evaporation. (Note how those in the first photo are much longer.) Sun exposure is evidently somewhat harsh because it has reddened even more. The horticultural term for this is “stress,” which is aesthetically desirable because it enhances color and symmetry. This plant may be a bit too stressed—leaf tips have scorched and growth has slowed—but look closely: It’s in bud.
What to do if you live in an often overcast climate or grow succulents mainly inside? This is from my website page, How to Grow Succulents in Seattle (Northern Climates):
Indoors, set them near windows that face south or west. Don’t bother with north-facing windows, but if your windows face east, do collect and enjoy low-light lovers such as haworthias and gasterias. [Read more]
 
*About Aloe maculata: Formerly known as Aloe saponaria (soap aloe) because the gel in its leaves lathers like soap, it is one of the few potentially invasive succulents, capable of sending up new plants from horizontal roots a few inches below the soil surface. Baby plants can pop up three feet or more from the mother! I have a colony of Aloe maculata in a rocky area of the garden where they can’t get into trouble, because I love the flowers, which are branching—unlike the columnar spikes of many other aloes. They don’t make good cut flowers, though, because cut stems ooze a mucilaginous gel. Aloe maculata is not often found at nurseries in Southern CA because there’s minimal demand for it (it’s a common passalong plant). A similar aloe that is better behaved, not toothed, often sold in nurseries, and much more prized in cultivation is Aloe striata (coral aloe). See it and others on my website’s Aloes page.
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How to Keep Succulents Happy Indoors

If you need (or prefer) to grow succulents indoors, outfit a basement, sun room, spare room or alcove with tables and shelves that can withstand moisture, plus lights and a fan that run on timers. Fortunately succulents need very little water. Dribble a little at the base of each plant every three weeks or so, enough to hydrate the roots but not so much it puddles on the floor.

Place your succulents near a window. Maximum sun exposure is on the south and west sides of your house. The farther north you live in North America, east will provide bright light, but not enough for crassulas, echeverias and aloes to maintain their red hues. [Read more] 

OR…

Install grow lights. Experts in growing succulents in gray-sky climates recommend T-5 grow lights.

Agrobrite FLT44 T5 Fluorescent Grow Light System, 4 Feet, 4 Tubes, about $120 on Amazon.

 

Create a “light island.” Shown below is arguably the ultimate indoor plant-shelf unit. Made of lightweight, powder-coated aluminum, it has adjustable lights with energy-efficient, full-spectrum bulbs; plastic drip trays; and wheels for easy positioning. Three shelves provide 18 square feet of growing space. From Gardener’s Supply Co.; about $600. 

Get a timer which automatically turns the lights on at, say, 7 a.m. and off eight hours later. I like this one, below, because it has multiple outlets:  Titan Apollo 14, about $26. 

Watch the temperature. If it falls below freezing (32 degrees F) many succulents may show long-term damage (or die). This indoor thermometer is digital and also has a humidity gauge. But what I love about it is that it keeps daily high and low temps for 24 hours!

AcuRite 00613 Humidity Monitor with Indoor Thermometer, Digital Hygrometer and Humidity Gauge Indicator, about $10 on Amazon.

Wonder why your otherwise healthy succulent is stretched and doesn’t flower? Go to: Why Doesn’t My Succulent Bloom?

 

 

 

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Succulent Color Wheel Rainbow Centerpiece

Succulent Color Wheel rainbow centerpiece from my online class, as seen in Garden Design magazine and my book, Succulents Simplified

I’m proud and pleased to announce that the winter issue (now shipping) of Garden Design, the premier magazine about the aesthetics of gardening, features my “Stunning Succulent Arrangements” online class and includes a photo of one of its seven projects—the Succulent Color Wheel rainbow centerpiece.*

For the rainbow centerpiece, you’ll need a large pot saucer and about six plants in 4-inch pots for each pie-shaped section. Succulents come in all colors, so have fun selecting them at your local garden center. Or if ordering them online, here are some suggestions:

Green: sempervivums, aeoniums, Crassula lycopodioes (watch chain)
Blue: echeverias, Senecio repens, Sedeveria ‘Blue Elf’, Pachyveria ‘Glauca’, Kalanchoe tomentosa
Purple: Echeveria ‘Perle von Nurnberg’, Echeveria ‘Neon Breakers’
Red: Sedum rubrotinctum, Peperomia graveolens
Orange: Sedum ‘Firestorm’, Graptosedum ‘California Sunset’, Euphorbia tirucalli‘Sticks on Fire’
YellowSedum adolphii, Crassula ovata ‘Sunset’

Method: Remove plants from their nursery pots and pack them tightly in a wide, shallow pot saucer so no soil shows. Place taller plants in the center, shorter around the rim, and arrange according to color. Water sparingly and give your Succulent Color Wheel plenty of bright light so hues stay vibrant.

Find many more types of succulents listed by color in my books. 

*Why It’s a Big Deal to be in Garden Design magazine

Garden Design has no ads, so there’s nothing to distract readers from the beauty of the photos.  It’s 148 pages of beautiful gardens and plants delivered each quarter. Many of the stories unfold over 8 to 20 pages—all behind-the-scenes look at topics we care about most: designing with plants, landscapes, container gardens, kitchen gardens, houseplants, and more. Each issue is collectible and coffee-table worthy. Everything about Garden Design, from paper and binding to writing is quality. I’m honored to contribute occasionally for Garden Design, too—not only in print, but on their excellent website as well. 

If you don’t get Garden Design yet, the Winter 2018 issue is a great one to start off with.
My friends get their first issue free when they subscribe!
Go online to https://www.gardendesign.com/dlb or call (855) 624-5110 Monday – Friday, 8 – 5 PST and mention this offer.

The red-orange-yellow side of the succulent color wheel. 

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Agave Snout Weevil Prevention and Treatment

VIDEO: Agave snout-nosed weevil (30 sec.)

The agave snout-nosed weevil is a half-inch-long black beetle with a downward-curving proboscis that enables it to pierce an agave’s core, where it lays its eggs. Grubs hatch, consume the agave’s heart, then burrow into the soil to pupate. The weevil (Scyphophorus acupunctatus)—once prevalent only in desert regions and Mexicois spreading rapidly throughout the US and abroad, earning it the dubious distinction of being one of the “Top 100 Worst Global Invasive Species.”

The agave in the middle shows signs of snout weevil infestation. This a block from my home (eek!)

According to the Global Invasive Species Database, “Scyphophorus acupunctatus is becoming a major pest of native Agavaceae and Dracaenaceae species worldwide. From Mexico, it has decimated populations of Agave crops there, in particular those used in the tequila industry. The importation of ornamental Agave plants worldwide has facilitated S. acupunctatus to establish in many parts of the world, particularly in Central America and the Caribbean, in Africa, Asia and South America.”

Is your agave infested? Look for damaged tissue where leaves meet stem. The lowest leaves will appear wilted, and may slope unnaturally downward while the center cone remains upright. The plant, no longer anchored by roots, will rock when pushed. When an infestation is well underway, it’s possible to shove the agave over onto its side. It’ll break at soil level, revealing a mushy, foul-smelling core infested by plump, squirming, half-inch, cream-colored grubs with brown heads.

Agave snout weevil

Above: an agave’s grub-eaten core resembles a sponge.

PamPenick_AgaveWeevilLarva_R

Above: Close-up of a snout-nose grub.

In my YouTube video, “Agave Snout Weevil Prevention and Treatment,” I demonstrate how to inspect nursery agaves, show resistant varieties, and interview agave expert Kelly Griffin at an infested colony of Agave americana. Kelly also talks about applying a systemic insecticide as a prophylactic (preventive) option.

How one homeowner does it: Succulent collector Jeanne Meadow is well versed in the fauna and flora of her large garden in Fallbrook, California, midway between Riverside and San Diego. Jeanne, an ace researcher, has become an expert on the agave snout-nose weevil. She says people tend to assume most nursery plants are pest-free, yet that’s the primary way snout weevil enters gardens. When an agave in her garden shows signs of infestation, she removes it and every plant for several feet surrounding it. Then she sifts the soil and picks out grubs and beetles. “It’s a huge undertaking,” Jeanne says. “Fortunately they’re slow crawlers.”

To remove a diseased agave, here’s Jeanne’s method:
1. Place a tarp around the plant.
2. Position a wheelbarrow nearby. Make sure the tarp covers the ground between it and the agave.
3. Dig up the agave and put in the wheelbarrow.
4. Dig out more dirt to a depth of 12 inches (deeper if you find grubs) and about 12 inches from where the base of the plant was.
5. As you transfer the soil to the wheelbarrow, inspect it for grubs and weevils.
6. The beetles “are hard to crush,” Jeanne says. “I use a hammer.”
7. Take the wheelbarrow to a paved area, like your driveway, so if beetles escape they’re easy to spot.
8. Transfer into heavy-duty trash bags, sprinkle contents with insecticide, and triple-tie.
9. Seal any rips with duct tape.
10. Drench the soil where the agave was with insecticide.

Aren’t insecticides bad for the environment? Although neither Jeanne nor I advocate inorganic pesticides, and we certainly aren’t licensed pest control experts, we strongly believe that the responsible thing to do is to share knowledge with others based on research and personal experience, and to do what we can to prevent the beetle from spreading. “This is an emergency situation,” Jeanne says. “The pest is spreading like crazy and has to be brought under control.” According to agave experts, growers, and pest management specialists, the best approach is preemptive: drench the soil around healthy agaves with a systemic insecticide that has imidacloprid as the main ingredient.

Hire a licensed pest control expert. The going rate is $175/hr., but you’ll know for certain that everything is done safely and protects the environment while eradicating the pest from your property. One in the San Diego area is Chris Mizoguchi, chrisagpestcontrol@hotmail.com.

How to preventatively treat your agaves. The goal is to drench the agave’s roots. Twice a year, in spring and fall, here’s what I do:

1. The night before, soak (hose-water) the soil at the base of each agave to aid penetration.
2. Read and follow the label directions. Be sure to wear gloves and protect your skin and eyes.
3. To mix the solution, I use a hose, a 3-to-5 gallon bucket, and a stick for stirring. Product labels don’t say how much concentrate per gallon of water for agaves, so I go with the ratio for shrubs. (If using Compare-N-Save Systemic Tree and Shrub Insect Drench, it’s 3 oz. per foot of height per gallon of water.)
4. Agaves naturally funnel rainwater water to their roots, so if you slosh the solution where lowest leaves meet the core, you’ll effectively drench the soil below them at the base of the plant.

Note: Avoid doing this in temperatures above 80 degrees F. High temps diminish the insecticide’s effectiveness and may even harm plants already stressed by heat. 

Don’t panic, but do pass the word. It’s only a matter of time before weevils in neighbors’ agaves find their way to yours (and vice-versa). The unfortunate reality is that agave owners who do nothing are inadvertently aiding the proliferation of a serious pest, and may incur the expense and inconvenience of removing prized, immense and spiky plants. I suggest you:
— Send close neighbors a friendly email with a link to this page.
— Post about agave snout weevil on your neighborhood’s online forum. If possible, include a photo of an infested agave.
— Copy-and-paste part or all of this into an email to the editor of your community newsletter. (All I ask is to be credited. With, of course, a link.)

Don’t assume your agaves won’t be affected. Although snout-nosed weevils can’t fly (yes, there are such things as flightless beetles), they sure can walk. I first suspected that snout-nose had arrived in my backcountry community northeast of San Diego when I noticed a collapsed Agave americana in a friend’s garden. I could barely believe it. She lives atop a rocky hill surrounded by acres and acres of native chaparral. Either the weevil had arrived via infested nursery stock (on a different agave most likely, seeing as the sick plant was part of an old colony), or it had walked in. I’ve since observed that it takes a captive weevil ten days to die despite receiving no water nor food. The entire time, it was mobile and capable of traveling 4 inches per second. Had I released it, it easily could have gone several blocks (at least). It also was a surprisingly good climber.

Consider: If a dying agave hosts dozens of grubs that turn into beetles, and if each takes off in a different direction, one or more will certainly find another agave.

A tiny concern. If your goal is to kill snout weevils before they spread, a systemic ought to do it, but it’s uncertain how much damage the puncture hole causes. The weevil is a vector (carrier) of Erwinia carotovora, a micro-organism that decomposes plant tissues, enabling grubs to easily consume it. I’m hopeful, and it seems likely, that the bacteria doesn’t go deeper unless spread by live grubs. Moreover, as I mention below (see “Good News”), bitten agaves have been known to recover.

GREEN ALERT: Insecticides kill beneficial insects as well as pests and may disrupt your garden’s natural predator-prey balance. Snout weevils have coexisted with agaves for millennia and are naturally preyed upon by reptiles, birds and mammals (though the spines that protect an agave from predation also protect the weevil). Systemics, as the name implies, transmit insecticides through a plant’s system, so that any bug that eats it dies. Some studies have indicated that bees and birds are not harmed by the nectar of treated plants, and that animals farther up the food chain are not at risk. Use sparingly and follow label directions. Don’t pour this (or for that matter, anything inorganic) into drains or gutters.

Weevil control without pesticides. Remove an agave at first sign of infestation and sift grubs and weevils out of the soil. (Feed them to your chickens or put them out with the trash in sealed plastic bags.) Don’t plant agaves in that part of your garden again, and watch your other agaves for signs of infestation. It’s possible that beneficial nematodes may be effective. They do kill larvae, but I’ve yet to find out if they’ll work against snout grubs. (Check back.)

Earthworm castings destroy beetle exoskeletons, advises Pat Welsh, author of Pat Welsh’s Southern California Organic Gardening: Month by Month. In Jan, 2018, in response to this post, she wrote: “Imadacloprid is killing bees. It is one of the worst ever pesticides and will end up killing us also. Instead of that, purchase earthworm castings and spread them on top of soil surrounding agaves. Keep it up. Earthworm castings kill all insect pests and are a great barrier to the ones that live in the ground under plants. Weevils walk on top of soil and cannot cross earthworm castings or they die. This is because earthworm castings contain chitinase, an enzyme that destroys chitin. The exoskeletons of insects are made of chitin.”

Good news ~
Agaves treated early in an infestation may recover, providing there’s adequate meristem tissue to regenerate new growth. (An agave’s meristem cells are at the core, or heart, where leaves join roots. It’s prime grub fodder.)
An organic control currently being tested is a pheromone trap designed to attract adult beetles in search of mates.
— Weevil-resistant Agave varieties do exist and are being selected and cultivated. (Sometimes you’ll see seemingly unaffected plants alongside diseased ones.) Tissue-culture labs make it possible to produce quantities of plants over a short period of time, which is likely the future of commercially-sold members of the Agaveaceae family.
— The weevil seems less inclined toward those with thin, flexible leaves, such as Agave attenuata; those with tough, hard-to-pierce leaves (such as agaves desmetiana, murpheyi, parryi, lophantha ‘Quadricolor’, ‘Sharkskin’, triangularis, victoriae-reginae and vilmoriniana); and those with slender, nonjuicy leaves such as agaves bracteosa, filifera and geminiflora. See photos on my website’s Agaves page.

CRW_1686_A_r

In the meantime…

Plant agaves bare-root. Before planting, remove an agave from its nursery pot, set the plant (root ball and all) in a wheelbarrow, and hose the soil from the roots. Examine the plant for beetles and puncture holes, and the soil for grubs. If a plant is infested, destroy it and inform the source nursery. Jeanne notes that when chased, weevils head back to the agave for shelter. “They don’t try to escape from the wheelbarrow.” Btw, after observing grubs kept alive in soil-filled jars, Jeanne says that when deprived of an agave to feed on, grubs don’t pupate (turn into weevils).

Grow agaves in pots. In areas where snout weevil is known to be active, plant agaves in containers like the urns shown here. You’ll know that the soil is OK because it came from a bag; you can easily get rid of infested soil should beetles show up; and when you apply a preventative drench, only the soil in the container is affected. Additional advantages are that pots elevate agaves for better viewing, enabling them to serve as garden focal points even when small. Potentially immense, pupping agaves (such as A. americana species) grow more slowly in containers, which also serve to corral their offsets.

The big green agave at left is likely a hybrid of A. salmiana; at right is A. franzosinii. In the foreground is what Jeanne Meadow calls “snout-weevil candy”: A. americana ‘Mediopicta Alba’.

Watch susceptible plants. Keep an eye on all your agaves, especially mature ones about to bloom, because they’re loaded with weevil-attracting carbohydrates. The pest seems to prefer specimens of Agave americana and its variegates (striped varieties), as well as closely related Agave franzosinii (one of the largest agaves). Reportedly, it may infest other genera in the Agavaceae family, such as Nolina, Beaucarnea, Yucca, and Furcraea. I’ve heard, but have yet to confirm, that it also attacks Mexican fence post cactus (Pachycereus marginatus) and possibly barrel cacti — but symptoms may simply be due to a different bug. After all, it’s a Pandora’s box out there.

Don’t give up on agaves! “Snout-nose shouldn’t discourage anyone from planting agaves,” Jeanne says. “There IS hope, and my garden is a great example of that.” She adds that the imidacloprid drench—which degrades over time—has had no apparent impact on her garden’s overall health and ecosystem, “including its population of beneficial insects, reptiles, birds, and amphibians.”

More info:

UC Nursery and Floracultural Alliance Regional Report, Spring 2016, “Agave Pests

Global Invasive Species Database

Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, AZ

Pam Penick’s blog post: “Evil Weevils! Agaves Under Attack in Austin”

Tropical Texana blog: http://tropicaltexana.blogspot.com/p/agave-weevil-eradication.html

View my 7-minute YouTube video, Agave Snout Weevil Prevention and Treatment

Note: This post first appeared in August, 2016. I’ve updated it several times, most recently in Jan., 2018.  I welcome your comments. — Debra

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Perfect Succulent Art-Pot Pairings

A few simple design principles can take your potted succulents from ho-hum to WOW. My new YouTube video, Tips for Perfect Succulent Art-Pot Pairings, is a must-see if you’ve ever wondered which succulents to choose for a container—especially art pottery. Follow my guidelines in this 3-min video, and you’ll be amazed at how polished and perfect your plant-pot combos will be!

Succulents (from Altman Plants):
Echeveria ‘Green Abalone’
Kalanchoe tomentosa ‘Chocolate Soldier’
Sedum adolphii
Echeveria ‘Topsy Turvy’
Echeveria pulidonis
Aloe ‘Christmas Sleigh’

Pots by Jeff Stewart of Oceanside, CA, jsstewbones@gmail.com

Subscribe to my YouTube channel to be notified whenever I release a new video.

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What’s Your Ultimate Aloe?

My ultimate aloes are any large, sculptural species with brilliant, Popsicle-like flowers that make striking garden plants even when not in bloom. Midwinter is peak aloe season and an excellent time to shop for them. Learn about lovely, easy-care aloes and see how they enhance gardens large and small in my book, Designing with Succulents (2nd ed.). 

Order nurseryman Jeff Moore’s beautifully illustrated Aloes and Agaves in Cultivation through my website and get 10% off

To determine what aloes you have or might add to your garden, visit my website’s Aloe Gallery for 50+ labeled photos.

Also enjoy my recently released videos:
Spectacular Aloes in Flower (NEW)
Hannah Jarson’s Aloe Eden

Above: Aloe ferox at Desert Theater nursery, Escondido, CA. From my video, Spectacular Aloes in Flower.