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LA’s Kids Day Features Succulents

One of the most popular areas of the annual Los Angeles Drought Tolerant Plant Festival is the “Kid’s Day” section, with fun educational exhibits and activities for children. Volunteers are members of the Los Angeles Cactus & Succulent Society (LACSS), a community-oriented organization that’s been around 80+ years.

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The event is held the second weekend of June. Here’s how the exhibit tables looked one year before the kids poured in.

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This little girl is the granddaughter of LACSS member Kathleen Misko. When I asked Veronica what she liked best about Kid’s Day, she replied, “The videos, because I’m in them!”

I sure wish I could have gone to an event like this when I was a child. Or, for that matter, when I began learning about succulents as an adult! Below, volunteers double-check everything.IMG_7967_A_R

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IMG_7994_A_RUpon arrival, each child received a bag of items: mini wooden saguaros to paint, a pot to fill with small rooted plants, and a wine cork with a magnet on the back to hold tiny cuttings.

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IMG_7974_A_RIt was delightful to watch the volunteers—many of them grandparents—assist kids pot-up the succulents they’d selected as parents proudly looked on. See what it’s all about ~ enjoy my 2.5-min. video.

 

Related Info on This Site:

Highlights of the Los Angeles Drought Tolerant Plant Festival
At the Los Angeles Cactus & Succulent Society Festival, I managed to smile despite sitting on a cactus cOUCH. [Continue reading]
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The Colors of Rancho La Puerta

Rancho La Puerta health and fitness spa in Tecate, Baja California, across the border east of San Diego, offers the best of Mexico’s food, climate and ambience. It’s also famous for mature gardens that offer a wonderfully immersive experience. The Ranch is a great getaway within half a day’s drive from nearly anywhere in SoCa. Amid the lush landscaping are guest casitas (bungalows), gyms, library, gift shop, dining hall, and much more. Ornamental plants include Mediterraneans such as rosemary, Australian trees (melaleucas), native oaks and palms, and succulents large and small. The majority are minimally watered (or not at all) and are well suited to the region’s arid climate. Below are a few favorite photos from a recent visit. Bienvenidos al Rancho!

In the lobby, stained glass windows by famed Julian artist/sculptor James Hubbell overlook a cactus-and-agave boulder garden.

Agave shawii (Shaw’s agave) is native to the Baja peninsula. When backlit, teeth along leaf margins glow shades of yellow, orange and red.

One reason I went in April was to see the Aloe striata (coral aloes) in bloom. They’re beautifully juxtaposed with a similarly red-orange ice plant.

Incorporated into the door of the art studio is a stained-glass-and-brass butterfly.

A mosaic by artists Linda Weill and Tilly Nylin near the concierge office depicts a garden of cacti and succulents. That’s a scrub jay at lower right.

Another mosaic holds a blackboard with inspirational sayings that change daily. Its top echoes the outline of mountains nearby.

At La Cocina Que Canta (the Kitchen that Sings), dining tables are decorated with Mexican textiles and folk art.

Want to see more? Be sure to watch my YouTube video, “The Succulents of Rancho La Puerta.”

Related Info on this site:

Even if you live in drought-parched Southern CA, garden plants that don’t need to be watered are not as hard to come by as you might think…[Continue reading]
Agaves are rosette-shaped succulents native to the Americas. There are dozens of species of Agave… [Continue reading]