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New Videos, Great Takeaways from Jeanne Meadow’s Garden

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

Wavy-leaved ‘Cornelius’ is Jeanne’s favorite agave. “It doesn’t get too big, can handle full sun and cold, and always looks good,” she says.

I’m pleased to announce the release this week on my YouTube channel of two fun new videos: Jeanne Meadow’s Succulent Garden, Tips and Tour, Part One and Part Two.

You know how people say that after they die they want to come back as so-and-so’s dog, because it’s so pampered? Well, I want to come back as a succulent in Jeanne Meadow’s garden. No one celebrates succulents quite like Jeanne. She’s gleeful about their shapes and colors, delights in adding them to garden beds, and collects art pots to showcase choice specimens. Each one is a special pet.

Here for your entertainment are some great takeaways from the new releases.

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

Plant an aloe outside your dining room window so you can enjoy its blooms and watch hummingbirds flit from flower to flower.

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

Unlike many gardeners, Jeanne doesn’t consider “mother of thousands” kalanchoes to be weeds. “They pop up everywhere, but they’re easy to pull,” she says. “And the flowers are gorgeous.”

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

Assemble a palette of topdressings to choose among. Collecting and displaying them is part of the fun. At right, a stack of planted pots appears to be tipping over—a whimsical illusion. They’re aligned on 3/4-inch rebar that goes into the ground four feet.

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

To successfully grow a succulent prone to rot like Echeveria agavoides ‘Black Knight’, plant it atop a mound of rocks so its roots never sit in water.

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

If you have a magnificent specimen like Jeanne’s large Agave nickelsiae (formerly Agave ferdinandi-regis), give it stand-alone space so it can be seen and admired.

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

“If dead leaves don’t pull off easily, it means the plant wants to keep them,” Jeanne says of her Aloe marlothii. “The trunk is sensitive and they help protect it.”

 

Jeanne Meadow's succulent garden

If you’re lucky enough to have a colorful mangave with translucent leaves (like ‘Kaleidoscope’), put it in a tall pot so sunlight will make it glow and it’ll be seen from all directions.

 

Related Info on This Site:

Make a Low-Light, Scooped-From-the-Garden Succulent Dish Garden 

Succulent dish garden

This succulent dish garden is perfect for a bright-shade location, such as indoors near a window. Owner Jeanne Meadow displays it on her covered patio and waters it…[Continue reading]

Use Crushed-Rock Top Dressing to Enhance Your Succulent Designs

Crushed rock topdressing

In the ground or in pots, your succulent compositions will look and perform better if bare soil doesn’t show. Top dressing lends a finished look, and plants benefit from the way…[Continue reading]

On My YouTube Channel:

Jeanne Meadow’s Succulents (Playlist) 

Books by Debra Lee Baldwin

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Make a Low-Light, “Scooped from the Garden” Succulent Arrangement

This succulent dish garden is perfect for a bright-shade location, such as indoors near a window. It makes a great gift, and all its components are readily available. Owner Jeanne Meadow displays it on her covered patio and waters it minimally (once a week in warm weather, once a month in cool).

Design by Megan Boone of Nature’s Containers, Temecula, CA, for Jeanne Meadow. 

You’ll need:

One rectangular 9×12 bonsai pot  (available at garden centers or online). A matte-finish, earth-toned container helps suggest that the composition came straight from the garden.

Cover the pot’s drain holes with pebbles or squares of screen so soil doesn’t fall out. Fill the pot nearly to the top with succulent potting soil and add:

Upper right corner: Aloe nobilis ‘Variegata’ rosette. Variegates like less sun and tend stay smaller than their solid-green cousins.

Lower right: A green sempervivum. This one’s fuzzy texture makes leaf edges look outlined with white.

Lower middle: Haworthia attenuata (zebra plant). It has intriguing raised white ridges and repeats the fountainlike shape of other plants.

Lower left: A  Sempervivum arachnoideum (cobweb houseleek) cluster fills the corner, repeats the solo sempervivum, and offers interesting texture accented with white.

Upper left: Gasteria bicolor. A little sun will bring out the red in its leaves. Its sculptural and its whitish dots serve as a subtle counterpoint to white on other plants.

Upper middle: A peperomia provides contrasting texture and serves as filler. Without it, the composition would be too regimented—less loose and natural. Any similarly sized and shaped succulent, such as Othonna capensis, will work as well.

Rocks: These three from Jeanne’s collection are varying sizes and shapes, are interesting in their own right, and are in scale with the plants. They also create planting pockets, making it possible to vary the elevation slightly.

Topdressing: By covering bare dirt, crushed rock gives a finished look and helps hold in soil moisture. And in keeping with the natural theme, this warm-toned gravel appears to have crumbled from the larger rocks.

Note that the gasteria is in bloom, but this isn’t about flowers. It showcases foliage, texture and form, as any good succulent container garden should!

Related Info:

See more of Megan Boone’s designs on my website.

Topdressings for succulent pots

YouTube: Learn more about Jeanne’s rocks and topdressings

Find additional succulent container ideas on my Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest pages.

Jeanne’s garden is also featured in my book, Designing with Succulents (2nd ed.).

Get Tips from a Top Succulent Container Garden Designer (Melissa Teisl).