Agave damaged by snout-nose weevil (c) Debra Lee Baldwin

The agave snout-nosed weevil exists in greater numbers and is more active than ever before. Don’t wait for signs of infestation; take preventative measures now to protect your agaves, furcraeas, beaucarneas, nolinas, mangaves and yuccas.

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Echeveria being sprayed (c) Debra Lee Baldwin

If you grow succulents, sooner or later you’ll deal with mealy bugs. For newbies, mealies often come as a surprise. Suddenly the plants are dotted and webbed with what looks like lint. Veterans are more vigilant. We check for

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Dormant aeonium (c) Debra Lee Baldwin

After a brutal, early-September heat wave, I address ten common, post-summer succulent concerns. You’ll see them in my a new six-minute video: Post-Summer Care for Succulents (6:49). It’s a candid, warts-and-all, behind-the-scenes, damage-control tour.

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Autumn succulent arrangement (c) Debra Lee Baldwin

These seasonal succulent must-do’s are mainly for southern and coastal CA, from the Bay Area south. If you live beyond, please visit my site’s Succulents By Season and Region page. 

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Succulent with cracked, scabby leaves

Are pests or mysterious maladies causing problems with your succulents? This page is a forum for you to ask questions, leave comments and share what works for you. Others can see and benefit from the answers. Your own tried-and-true solutions are welcome, too! 

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Aloe mite (c) Debra Lee Baldwin

They seem everywhere in spring: mite-damaged aloes ranging from dwarf cultivars to tree ‘Hercules’. The microscopic pests (Eriophyes aloines) are not insects but spider relatives. They cause deformed flowers, a bubbly fringe on leaf edges, and orange-and-green growths where leaves meet stems. Aloe mite causes distorted, cancerous-like growth Google “aloe mite treatment,” “aloe mite prevention,” “aloe gall” or “aloe cancer,” and you’ll discover…

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Agave snout-nosed weevil is a half-inch-long black beetle with a downward-curving proboscis that enables it to pierce an agave’s core, where it lays its eggs. Grubs hatch, consume the agave’s heart, then burrow into the soil to pupate.

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A newly caught gopher (lower right) in my garden. UPDATE: Thanks to Grangetto’s Farm and Garden Supply (in the San Diego area), I now recommend the GopherHawk, a new trapping device that’s more efficient than the classic method described below. ~ Debra Lee Baldwin  GopherHawk Trapping Set NOTE: If an agave keels over and there’s…

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