Succulents and Too Much Rain, A French Solution

I like how the Jardin Zoologique Tropical in southeastern France keeps their succulents from becoming waterlogged during seasonal rainstorms. Corrugated fiberglass panels atop metal bars tent the plants so excess rain doesn’t soak the soil.

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The structures are tall enough to allow good air circulation, and the panels are translucent, enabling maximum sunlight to reach the plants. The covers, which have a horizontal metal rod atop them so wind can’t lift them, also protect tender succulents from frost.

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Notice, too, that the plants grow in rocky, elevated, sloping soil, so water drains away from the roots.

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You might do something similar in your own garden with a patio umbrella secured in a concrete base. But keep in mind that the water has to go somewhere. The French garden’s panels channel rain onto the gravel roadway nearby.

Btw, this public garden, located near the village of La Londe-les-Maures, is deservedly proud of its succulent collection. Here’s a description from the website, courtesy of Google Translate. The common names of the plants are charming.

Our plant collection is rich in many varieties of succulent plants: agaves, aloes and euphorbias. Every season their blooms transform the gardens. We regularly introduce little-known species and observe them for their ornamental potential. Perhaps the best known are cacti native to the Americas. We grow several species hardy in our climate. Some are globular, like the famous “mother-cushions,” others are elongated, cylindrical and commonly called “candle cactus.” Visitors easily identify the “prickly pear,” also called “Mickey Mouse ears” or “cactus rackets.”

(Photos used with permission.)

 

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